A simple fool

A simple fool

A late May long weekend filled with sunshine, cups of tea outside, forget-me-not spotting, pig-scratching and the cricket on the radio. Just the tonic. As you may have gleaned from my verging-on-complainey Twitter and Instagram feeds, my day job situation has been incredibly busy and a little unfun recently. This weekend however – work free so far! – is turning out to be a sweet oasis of calm in the middle of a pretty tempestuous period. I’m celebrating by escaping London, chatting to pigs (a favourite pastime) at Kate Humble’s farm and eating.

There’s been quiche and flapjack and apple cake and goat’s cheese and griddled asparagus. There’s the promise of a barbecue with sausages and peppers and burgers and tomato salad and good bread this evening with summer fruit trifle after. There’s also been two fruit fools in one day because why not. One a stunning violet-coloured blackcurrant pud over at Humble by Nature and the other a very hastily thrown together summer berry variation eaten at dusk in the garden. It’s been a bloody good weekend.

This fool is really simple to make and even easier to devour. The quantities are approximate because there’s really not that much that could go wrong. There is so much you could add to, substitute and change in this recipe – it’s really just a guide. We used our first punnet of strawberries of the year (rejoice!), frozen raspberries and blueberries because that’s what we had in.  Enjoy.

Ingredients

  • 250g UK-grown strawberries – washed and roughly topped and quartered
  • A couple of handfuls of raspberries
  • A couple of handfuls of blueberries
  • A 227ml pot of organic double cream
Summer fruit fool
Pudding in a jam jar in the garden

Method

  1. Whip the double cream by hand with a balloon whisk or with an electric whisk until it thickens but is still light. When you have soft peaks forming when you lift the whisk, you’re there.
  2. Combine the fruit (keeping a few berries back for decorating) in a separate bowl and mash roughly with a fork.
  3. Lightly fold the fruit and its juices into the cream being careful not to mix too much – just a gentle marbling of the red and white will do it.
  4. Serve in jam jars/glass dishes/on a spoon straight from the mixing bowl depending on the purpose of your pud.

One Comment

  1. Lindsey Bickley

    I love it. It’s really good on meringue nests too!

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